Category Archives: Adult Coloring

Pencils vs Markers for adult coloring

If you’re reading this, it means you already know about the fun it is in adult coloring and you’re now at the point where you’ve come to learn more about what you like/dislike about this new hobby.

You may like better organic shapes or you may like a lot geometric patterns. Some may go for the simple illustrations, whereas some have the patience for the intricate designs.

The best question to begin with though it’s…what to use for coloring? Is it better with pencils or markers should always the no.1 choice?

Why get colored pencils

What we really like about the colored pencils is how easy they are to control. Sure, a marker’s ink isn’t able to give so much dramatic differences in color concentration, whereas a pencil may get lighter or darker depending on the pressure you apply while coloring.

coloring for adults

If you realize you actually want a darker hue on some area, you simply apply greater pressure while coloring. This is why you may get all those values of the same color to create gradients and or effects when using pencils.

Colored pencils are also giving you a nice tactile interaction with your coloring project. The smooth sensation of a colored pencil across of a nice weight paper is so relaxing. You may only get a soft, nice texture with a soft depth.

The downsides of colored pencils

The best part of the colored pencils is also their big flaw. Yes, you do get darker colors or higher saturations, but you do need to apply so intense focused pressure. This is challenging especially when you’re working with lighter paperweights, on both sides. You may end up with some stroke marks from the pencils.

When getting coloring books, try to get the models with 80-100lb. text stock on interior pages. The extra heft is going to give each page a good rigidity, closed to the cover stock one.

Keep in mind that a high paper thickness is longer lasting, whereas the risk for wear and tear it with the coloring pencil is minor.

Tips when using colored pencils

It’s not a bad idea to slide a thin piece of acrylic behind the page you’re working on. A more rigid surface is going to minimize risk for pressing and warping into the soft paper beneath.

If you’re looking though to get the richest array of color values, it’s best to look for some coloring markers.

The goods of the markers

One thing we all like when coloring with markers is that they give crisp, clean bodies of color. The high level of saturation from the ink flowing onto the paper is their strength, for sure.

We also appreciate the consistency in each stroke when coloring with markers. If you’re especially look for the uniform bodies of colors, markers are your best choice.

Even though we all like the accuracy and control of the colored pencils, the coloring marker sets come with “blender pens”. These pens let you mingle efficiently the neighboring marker colors into a single, soft gradient. Take your time and practice as the blender marker may give the opportunity of getting nice, one-of-a-kind color melding effects.

The flaws of coloring markers

There’s no doubt that we all like clean, solid field of crisp color from the markers. At the same time, we do have two handle two common problems: the ink is wet or the ink color is rather flat.

If you’re using some porous paper, ink may soak through, warp or, some may say, “bleed”. The coarser your paper is, the more damage you may expect from ink. This is why most adult coloring books come with fine grain paper.

Try to get coloring books that combine smooth texture, heavy weight paper (80 lb., the least) that even takes a bit bending.

As for the flat colors, we all know that markers can’t get lighter or darker just because of the tactile interaction. This is one challenge you have to take when trying the combine or graduate some hues or tones from one to another.

Tips when coloring with markers

It’s not very easy to blend markers. The best way to do it is to use similar bands of color, to progress from light to dark. You should use a blending marker to combine the bands into more cohesive transitions.

You do need to practice though and you do get best results when planning your process. Some may even see this as the best part when coloring with markers, so it’s an up to you. Take your time and be willing to learn new techniques for coloring with markers.

Which one is the best for you?

Only taking chances and coloring you’re going to see which one works the best choice for you. You may even discover that you like both colored pencils and markers, as the entire experience is different on so many levels. As long as you’re having the will and the time, why not try them both anyways?